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Projects (7)
BBB led a community-based planning effort for Washington, DC’s Adams Morgan neighborhood, resulting in a vision framework that preserves character and enhances quality of life.
A Land Use Framework is guiding the development of a new Aga Khan University Hospital and Wellness Campus in downtown Kampala, where a diversity of activities will foster a vibrant teaching-learning-healing environment.
A vision to reposition Downtown Far Rockaway as a vibrant and inviting pedestrian-oriented district with retail and affordable housing that serves local residents and attracts a broad mix of visitors.
A historic partnership between Colby College and the City of Waterville has resulted in a revitalization plan that is transforming Downtown Waterville with economic development, cultural programs, and new public spaces.
An urban design and investment framework to support affordable housing, job creation, and waterfront development in the South Bronx.
Providing a vision for the Atlanta Braves’ new baseball stadium district, BBB designed an active, year-round public plaza surrounded by entertainment and retail buildings at the heart of the new ballpark.
A master plan for one of the largest urban infill sites in Denver will transform the area into a mixed-use, urban neighborhood and a regional transit hub.
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Stories (37)
Essex Crossing is a new mixed-use, multi-income development for Manhattan’s largest stretch of undeveloped land below 96th Street, a vast tract known as the Seward Park Urban Renewal Area.
During the week of September 7th, Miriam Kelly attended the sixteenth international congress of the International Committee for the Conservation of the Industrial Heritage (TICCIH) in Lille, France. TICCIH is the world organization for industrial heritage, promoting international cooperation toward the preservation and interpretation of industrial heritage as a cultural resource.
Each spring, Open House New York hosts a benefit in a building under construction. The event was held on Wednesday May 7th, 2014, inside 837 Washington Street, Morris Adjmi’s thoroughly contemporary twist on the industrial aesthetic of the Meatpacking District.
Extell Development Company has announced the launch of sales at 70 Charlton, a new ground-up residential building located on a through-block site in the heart of the emerging Hudson Square neighborhood. The project is designed by Beyer Blinder Belle in collaboration with interiors firm workshop/APD.
Each year the Preservation League of New York presents its most prestigious commendation, The Pillar of New York Award, to those who have demonstrated a keen understanding of the value of New York’s historic resources by taking extraordinary actions to protect, preserve, and promote those assets.
BBB has developed a master plan for The Cordish Companies for a $200 million mixed-used district anchored by the Texas Rangers stadium, featuring dining, entertainment, a hotel and a convention facility in the heart of Arlington. Last week, Arlington City Council unanimously approved the major economic development project in a 9-0 vote. Cordish Companies and BBB have worked together for more than 15 years on mixed-used entertainment districts including Kansas City Live! in the Kansas City Power & Light District, the master plan for the Saint Louis Ballpark Village in conjunction with the St. Louis Cardinals, and on Pier IV also called Power Plant Live! in Baltimore. An article in the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, which chronicles this milestone for Arlington’s sports-anchored mixed use development project, is featured below.
From October 17-20, nearly 40,000 people from 193 different countries gathered in Quito Ecuador at the Habitat III conference to discuss implementation of the New Urban Agenda (NUA).
“It is truly exciting to help shape the transformation of yet another DC neighborhood. For the Adams Morgan Vision Framework project, we are fortunate to be able to build upon our work on the citywide DC Vision Plan and Anacostia Waterfront Initiative of a decade ago.” —Kevin Storm, AIA, AICP, LEED AP
The reinvention of Colony Square – Atlanta’s first mixed-use development – is scheduled to break ground October 10th. The iconic mid-century modern complex, originally constructed in the early 1970s, is undergoing transformation into a vibrant commercial, retail, residential and cultural destination in the heart of Midtown.
Across the Potomac River from Washington, DC, Rosslyn’s Central Place – a new mixed-use development designed by BBB for the JBG Companies – broke ground in April. Located immediately adjacent to the Rosslyn Metro station, the pair of high-rise buildings – one residential, one an office building – is envisioned as a catalyst for revitalizing downtown Rosslyn, an area that currently suffers from limited urban character and public amenities.
The Bronx Chamber of Commerce presented its Adaptive Reuse Award for the Banknote Building, designed by BBB, at its Inaugural Building Awards ceremony held on October 29. BBB’s adaptive reuse of the landmark 1909 printing plant in the Hunts Point neighborhood of the Bronx creates a vibrant, mixed-use hub that supports the revitalization of the surrounding community and celebrates the area’s history.
“The Union Station Redevelopment Corporation (USRC), together with its partners Amtrak and Akridge, have commissioned Beyer Blinder Belle Architects & Planners LLP and Grimshaw Architects (BBB/Grimshaw) to create the Master Development Plan for Union Station’s 2nd Century.
An article in The New York Times examines how Grand Central Terminal, one of America’s great civic spaces, still captures our attention. David Dunlap’s piece, accompanied by a time-lapse video shot by Damon Winter, takes a look at the iconic Oyster Bar ramp hall, which was reclaimed in a comprehensive renovation by BBB.
For two days each October, the annual Open House New York (OHNY) Weekend unlocks the doors of New York’s most important buildings and sites, offering an extraordinary opportunity to experience the city and meet the people who design, build, and preserve New York.
On Thursday November 9th, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, the Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corporation, and local dignitaries celebrated the opening of Building 77, a WWII-era storage facility and former warehouse that has been transformed into a state-of-the-art commercial and light manufacturing space with a ground floor marketplace.
Detroit has become a symbol of post-industrial distress. Ruin voyeurs photograph scenes of overwhelming decay and the uncanny incursion of nature into spaces once dedicated to the manmade. But just as they overlook the underlying sadness of dereliction, so they ignore the vibrancy of an active city with a population working to translate loss into opportunity.
The 1055 Wisconsin Avenue project seamlessly blends new residential and retail components into the heart of Georgetown overlooking the historic C&O Canal. BBB team members visited the site to view progress of Georgetown’s latest condominium residences, located only steps from Washington Harbour, Waterfront Park, and the shops and bistros of M Street. Hany Hassan, FAIA, director of BBB’s DC office, reflects on the project after leading a tour of 1055 Wisconsin Avenue.
The TWA Terminal at JFK International Airport has been honored with a prestigious American Architecture Award, bestowed by the Chicago Athenaeum in recognition of excellence in architecture and urbanism in the United States.
If you’ve read Robert Caro’s seminal book on Robert Moses, The Power Broker, you may recall the story of the controversy regarding the Manhattantown urban renewal project on the Upper West Side. While the project ultimately was built in the late 1950s, public scrutiny forced a new conversation about urban renewal efforts.
In his article for Urban Land, writer Sean Slater presents several case studies illustrating the rise of anti-suburban shopping destinations: authentic, urban retail environments purveying locally-crafted goods alongside mass produced merchandise. Among the projects featured is Chicago’s 53rd Street retail district, excerpt below:
The Master Plan for the New York Public Library’s flagship Stephen A. Schwarzman Building was developed by Mecanoo and Beyer Blinder Belle, who are leading the renovation of the Library’s Midtown Campus.
Architectural Musings: Hand and Word is a series of thoughts and sketches inspired by travel, design currents and other worldly observations. Installment #1 is an excerpt from BBB Managing Partner Fred Bland’s introductory remarks at the second annual Fitch Foundation symposium, “The Accidental Preservationist: Artists, Artisans, Outliers & the Future of Historic Preservation,” held on October 17, 2014 in New York City. Fred, who serves as the Chairman of the Fitch Foundation, shares his reflections on the evolution of the preservation movement.
Contemplating the 50th anniversary of the New York City Landmarks Law—which was being formulated when Penn Station was threatened with demolition and enacted only after it was lost—it is interesting to look at the ways in which preservation and design are intrinsically linked, and the importance of the narrative.
Managing Partner Frederick Bland was asked to present at the SCUP 2014 North Atlantic Symposium: “Building Excellence from the Ground Up: Stony Brook’s First 50 Years.” This symposium reflected on Stony Brook University’s rapid development into a leading public research university, examined several initiatives that transformed the Stony Brook campus, and the challenges and opportunities in maintaining a research university for the coming decades.
“It was thrilling to experience this first great milestone in the realization of a plan that will transform what has long felt like the back of the Princeton community and the University campus into a new front door – a gateway to the Princetons, a center for the arts, and a vibrant nexus of campus and community life. We are grateful to be a part of an incredibly dedicated team, to realize the University’s bold vision for a new neighborhood.” -Neil Kittredge, Partner
In our first installment of “In Construction,” a new series that explores behind-the-scenes building technologies and methods, we take a look at Central Place* and three unique aspects of the project: the challenges of building within and connections around a transit hub; capitalizing views atop Metro DC’s tallest building; and the James Carpenter-designed lobby.
Excerpted from the Spring 2017 AIANYS Quarterly Should there be a building? What purpose will it serve? How will it advance the vision of an urban or academic community? How will it transform and redefine its context? A traditional design process often begins after these questions have been answered and a site has been selected – yet much of the impact of a new building lies in the essential qualities of what, where, and why.
Established in 2000, BBB’s DC office has developed into a major architectural practice with a portfolio of diverse projects and established relationships with the city’s architectural community and its most important review agencies. During this time, the office has been involved in several initiatives – combining city planning, urban design, and historic preservation – that are repairing and revitalizing previously neglected and underutilized areas of downtown DC. Below, we focus on Capitol Crossing in Washington’s Downtown East neighborhood, a transformative project that is “healing” the city.
The Following Function series explores projects in Europe and the US that pioneer the creative reuse of redundant industrial sites, and considers the implications for heritage conservation and post-industrial communities.
Cleary Larkin worked as an architect for BBB from June 2007 to May 2015. She is currently pursuing a PhD in Urban Planning at the University of Florida, where she intends to focus on the development of local preservation strategies within early 20th-century city planning. Here she considers how preservationists, designers and planners can better collaborate.
After 40 years idle, the historic 1901 Hahne & Company Department Store in downtown Newark has undergone a transformative renovation and will soon be home to a lively mix of residential, retail, commercial, and cultural tenants. Across Broad Street from Military Park – a green oasis in the downtown – and connecting directly with the Newark campuses of Rutgers and the New Jersey Institute of Technology, the redevelopment is poised to serve as a valuable asset to the community as well as a model for urban revitalization and creative place-making.
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Profile (2)
“Architecture and planning are subsets of our larger goal: engaged urbanism. Whether working on a cultural landmark in need of conservation, a new building, a downtown, or a campus plan, we consider it our highest responsibility to serve the larger community, in both physical and social form.”