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Projects(9)

At Ellis Island, BBB has made a cultural and historical symbol of American immigration accessible to generations of visitors.

For the Muhammad Ali Center, a cultural and educational institution that interprets Ali’s life story and inspirational message, BBB designed a new building on a prominent site overlooking the Ohio River.

BBB has transformed a high-end retail emporium into a contemplative environment for the Rubin Museum of Art, the largest facility devoted to Himalayan art in the Western World.

BBB’s work on the Lincoln Center Promenade creates a vibrant, new cultural corridor that better connects the Performing Arts Center with the surrounding cityscape.

The South Street Seaport Museum is the cultural focus of four blocks of new and restored buildings in lower Manhattan.

The award winning preservation plans for the Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor re-envisioned the canal system as a 524-mile linear park utilizing recreational improvements to enhance economic development and highlight the rich cultural and historical heritage of the corridor and its necklace of villages, towns, and cities.

In Shanghai’s historic Luwan District, BBB has transformed a 6.45-hectare site into a landscaped cultural park, including a new 2,000-seat theater with a geometrically complex envelope design.

A historic partnership between Colby College and the City of Waterville has resulted in a revitalization plan that is transforming Downtown Waterville with economic development, cultural programs, and new public spaces.

BBB’s restoration and redevelopment of Exchange Palace, a monumental historic landmark in the center of Budapest, Hungary, will create a dynamic mix of office, retail, and cultural uses.

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Stories(10)

The General Society of Mechanics & Tradesmen of the City of New York was founded in 1785. For more than 200 years, the General Society has selected four New York architects to highlight iconic buildings and landmarks of social, historical and cultural significance at their Labor, Literature and Landmarks Lecture Series. The Lecture Series pays tribute to the art of craftsmanship by featuring master artisans who lecture about the intricacies of their specialized crafts. The lectures are held in the General Society’s Library, founded in 1820, the second oldest library in New York City and one of three remaining private membership circulating libraries.

Adding to an existing building, compared with ground-up new construction, isn’t always so glamorous.

The Following Function series explores projects in Europe and the US that pioneer the creative reuse of redundant industrial sites, and considers the implications for heritage conservation and post-industrial communities.

Throughout much of history, there was no distinction between architects, engineers, and builders. Instead, an individual—the master builder—conceived of the form and materials of a building at the outset and followed it through until construction came to an end, taking responsibility for all of the challenges that arose during the project. This kind of continuity throughout the life of a project is intuitively beneficial: engineering and construction requirements shape the approach long before ground is broken and design decisions need to be made until the final touches are in place. Many of the world's great monuments, from the Parthenon to Brunelleschi's Dome at the Florence Cathedral, were built in this way.

“It was thrilling to experience this first great milestone in the realization of a plan that will transform what has long felt like the back of the Princeton community and the University campus into a new front door – a gateway to the Princetons, a center for the arts, and a vibrant nexus of campus and community life. We are grateful to be a part of an incredibly dedicated team, to realize the University’s bold vision for a new neighborhood.”

-Neil Kittredge, Partner

Detroit has become a symbol of post-industrial distress. Ruin voyeurs photograph scenes of overwhelming decay and the uncanny incursion of nature into spaces once dedicated to the manmade. But just as they overlook the underlying sadness of dereliction, so they ignore the vibrancy of an active city with a population working to translate loss into opportunity.

"It is truly exciting to help shape the transformation of yet another DC neighborhood. For the Adams Morgan Vision Framework project, we are fortunate to be able to build upon our work on the citywide DC Vision Plan and Anacostia Waterfront Initiative of a decade ago." —Kevin Storm, AIA, AICP, LEED AP

Contemplating the 50th anniversary of the New York City Landmarks Law—which was being formulated when Penn Station was threatened with demolition and enacted only after it was lost—it is interesting to look at the ways in which preservation and design are intrinsically linked, and the importance of the narrative.

Among the eleven Modernism in America Awards announced today by Docomomo US, the restored TWA Flight Center at JFK International Airport is the recipient of the 2015 Commercial Design Award of Excellence and one of three Saarinen buildings selected for an award.

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Persons(2)

“Architecture and planning are subsets of our larger goal: engaged urbanism. Whether working on a cultural landmark in need of conservation, a new building, a downtown, or a campus plan, we consider it our highest responsibility to serve the larger community, in both physical and social form.”

Peter Scaglione is an architect and planner with more than 25 years of experience on projects ranging from major cultural and civic centers to urban and waterfront developments involving residential, transportation and other uses.