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Projects(10)

Providing a vision for the Atlanta Braves’ new baseball stadium district, BBB designed an active, year-round public plaza surrounded by entertainment and retail buildings at the heart of the new ballpark.

An urban design and investment framework to support affordable housing, job creation, and waterfront development in the South Bronx.

A historic partnership between Colby College and the City of Waterville has resulted in a revitalization plan that is transforming Downtown Waterville with economic development, cultural programs, and new public spaces.

A vision to reposition Downtown Far Rockaway as a vibrant and inviting pedestrian-oriented district with retail and affordable housing that serves local residents and attracts a broad mix of visitors.

A new Aga Khan University Hospital and Wellness Campus in Kampala, Uganda, will create a unique and vibrant teaching-learning-healing environment in the city center.

BBB led a community-based planning effort for Washington, DC’s Adams Morgan neighborhood, resulting in a vision framework that preserves character and enhances quality of life.

A master plan for one of the largest urban infill sites in Denver will transform the area into a mixed-use, urban neighborhood and a regional transit hub.

BBB’s vision for the Jacksonville Sports Complex creates an inviting, vibrant mixed-use district anchored by EverBank Field, home of the Jacksonville Jaguars.

BBB’s study provides a road map for advancing a 32-mile loop of bicycle and pedestrian connections along Manhattan’s waterfront.

A flexible framework to enliven the notable downtown core, Envision Columbus seeks to define the city not only by excellence of design but also by its livability and vibrancy.

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Stories(10)

The TWA Terminal at JFK International Airport has been honored with a prestigious American Architecture Award, bestowed by the Chicago Athenaeum in recognition of excellence in architecture and urbanism in the United States.

Essex Crossing is a new mixed-use, multi-income development for Manhattan’s largest stretch of undeveloped land below 96th Street, a vast tract known as the Seward Park Urban Renewal Area.

Detroit has become a symbol of post-industrial distress. Ruin voyeurs photograph scenes of overwhelming decay and the uncanny incursion of nature into spaces once dedicated to the manmade. But just as they overlook the underlying sadness of dereliction, so they ignore the vibrancy of an active city with a population working to translate loss into opportunity.

Architectural Musings: Hand and Word is a series of thoughts and sketches inspired by travel, design currents and other worldly observations. Installment #1 is an excerpt from BBB Managing Partner Fred Bland’s introductory remarks at the second annual Fitch Foundation symposium, “The Accidental Preservationist: Artists, Artisans, Outliers & the Future of Historic Preservation,” held on October 17, 2014 in New York City. Fred, who serves as the Chairman of the Fitch Foundation, shares his reflections on the evolution of the preservation movement.

“It is truly exciting to help shape the transformation of yet another DC neighborhood. For the Adams Morgan Vision Framework project, we are fortunate to be able to build upon our work on the citywide DC Vision Plan and Anacostia Waterfront Initiative of a decade ago.” —Kevin Storm, AIA, AICP, LEED AP

Contemplating the 50th anniversary of the New York City Landmarks Law—which was being formulated when Penn Station was threatened with demolition and enacted only after it was lost—it is interesting to look at the ways in which preservation and design are intrinsically linked, and the importance of the narrative.

An article in The New York Times examines how Grand Central Terminal, one of America’s great civic spaces, still captures our attention. David Dunlap’s piece, accompanied by a time-lapse video shot by Damon Winter, takes a look at the iconic Oyster Bar ramp hall, which was reclaimed in a comprehensive renovation by BBB.

Each year the Preservation League of New York presents its most prestigious commendation, The Pillar of New York Award, to those who have demonstrated a keen understanding of the value of New York’s historic resources by taking extraordinary actions to protect, preserve, and promote those assets.

For two days each October, the annual Open House New York (OHNY) Weekend unlocks the doors of New York’s most important buildings and sites, offering an extraordinary opportunity to experience the city and meet the people who design, build, and preserve New York.

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Persons(1)

“Architecture and planning are subsets of our larger goal: engaged urbanism. Whether working on a cultural landmark in need of conservation, a new building, a downtown, or a campus plan, we consider it our highest responsibility to serve the larger community, in both physical and social form.”